Hot Best Seller

Talk Like TED: The 9 Public-Speaking Secrets of the World's Top Minds

Availability: Ready to download

Ideas are the currency of the twenty-first century. In order to succeed, you need to be able to sell your ideas persuasively. This ability is the single greatest skill that will help you accomplish your dreams. Many people have a fear of public speaking or are insecure about their ability to give a successful presentation. Now public speaking coach and bestselling author C Ideas are the currency of the twenty-first century. In order to succeed, you need to be able to sell your ideas persuasively. This ability is the single greatest skill that will help you accomplish your dreams. Many people have a fear of public speaking or are insecure about their ability to give a successful presentation. Now public speaking coach and bestselling author Carmine Gallo explores what makes a great presentation by examining the widely acclaimed TED Talks, which have redefined the elements of a successful presentation and become the gold standard for public speaking. TED ? which stands for technology, entertainment, and design ? brings together the world's leading thinkers. These are the presentations that set the world on fire, and the techniques that top TED speakers use will make any presentation more dynamic, fire up any team, and give anyone the confidence to overcome their fear of public speaking. In his book, Carmine Gallo has broken down hundreds of TED talks and interviewed the most popular TED presenters, as well as the top researchers in the fields of psychology, communications, and neuroscience to reveal the nine secrets of all successful TED presentations. Gallo's step-by-step method makes it possible for anyone to deliver a presentation that is engaging, persuasive, and memorable. Carmine Gallo's top 10 Wall Street Journal Bestseller Talk Like TED will give anyone who is insecure about their public speaking abilities the tools to communicate the ideas that matter most to them, the skill to win over hearts and minds, and the confidence to deliver the talk of their lives. The opinions expressed by Carmine Gallo in TALK LIKE TED are his own. His book is not endorsed, sponsored or authorized by TED Conferences, LLC or its affiliates.


Compare

Ideas are the currency of the twenty-first century. In order to succeed, you need to be able to sell your ideas persuasively. This ability is the single greatest skill that will help you accomplish your dreams. Many people have a fear of public speaking or are insecure about their ability to give a successful presentation. Now public speaking coach and bestselling author C Ideas are the currency of the twenty-first century. In order to succeed, you need to be able to sell your ideas persuasively. This ability is the single greatest skill that will help you accomplish your dreams. Many people have a fear of public speaking or are insecure about their ability to give a successful presentation. Now public speaking coach and bestselling author Carmine Gallo explores what makes a great presentation by examining the widely acclaimed TED Talks, which have redefined the elements of a successful presentation and become the gold standard for public speaking. TED ? which stands for technology, entertainment, and design ? brings together the world's leading thinkers. These are the presentations that set the world on fire, and the techniques that top TED speakers use will make any presentation more dynamic, fire up any team, and give anyone the confidence to overcome their fear of public speaking. In his book, Carmine Gallo has broken down hundreds of TED talks and interviewed the most popular TED presenters, as well as the top researchers in the fields of psychology, communications, and neuroscience to reveal the nine secrets of all successful TED presentations. Gallo's step-by-step method makes it possible for anyone to deliver a presentation that is engaging, persuasive, and memorable. Carmine Gallo's top 10 Wall Street Journal Bestseller Talk Like TED will give anyone who is insecure about their public speaking abilities the tools to communicate the ideas that matter most to them, the skill to win over hearts and minds, and the confidence to deliver the talk of their lives. The opinions expressed by Carmine Gallo in TALK LIKE TED are his own. His book is not endorsed, sponsored or authorized by TED Conferences, LLC or its affiliates.

30 review for Talk Like TED: The 9 Public-Speaking Secrets of the World's Top Minds

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    It was very difficult to rate this book. The advice in it is all good; it's just not by any means secret. The 9 points, in fact, are pretty obvious and to be found in most decent books on public speaking. Be passionate, tell stories, have a conversation with the audience, say something surprising, be funny, use sensory details, stick to what you know and get it all done in 18 minutes. Any real secrets there? What makes the book worth reading are the TED stories and examples. Gallo is a good writ It was very difficult to rate this book. The advice in it is all good; it's just not by any means secret. The 9 points, in fact, are pretty obvious and to be found in most decent books on public speaking. Be passionate, tell stories, have a conversation with the audience, say something surprising, be funny, use sensory details, stick to what you know and get it all done in 18 minutes. Any real secrets there? What makes the book worth reading are the TED stories and examples. Gallo is a good writer and he's done his homework. It's a competent book filled with great advice. If you don't have any books on public speaking, this would be a fine one to start with. There's just nothing new in here, and certainly no secrets.

  2. 5 out of 5

    da AL

    Even if you don't think you'll ever need to speak persuasively or make a presentation (though doesn't everyone need to at some point?), this book is still fun for how it presents a sort of 'best of Ted Talks' while giving a great dissection of what makes them great.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David

    If you have never heard of "TED Talks", then immediately go over to the TED web site and listen to some of the best short talks you've ever heard. If you are familiar with TED talks, then you already know how fantastic they are, covering a wide range of topics dealing with new, important ideas. This book is an excellent guide to public speaking. Carmine Gallo analyzes some of the most popular TED talks. He describes how to make your own presentations/speeches/sales pitches as engaging as possible If you have never heard of "TED Talks", then immediately go over to the TED web site and listen to some of the best short talks you've ever heard. If you are familiar with TED talks, then you already know how fantastic they are, covering a wide range of topics dealing with new, important ideas. This book is an excellent guide to public speaking. Carmine Gallo analyzes some of the most popular TED talks. He describes how to make your own presentations/speeches/sales pitches as engaging as possible. He details his nine "secrets" that can help make a successful presentation. What are his secrets? Well, they aren't really secret at all; they are common sense. The secrets include being passionate about one's subject, keep the title of your presentation short, keep the talk to within an 18-minute time limit, use stories to illustrate concepts and engage the listener, don't tell jokes, but instead use humor, include some attention-grabbing information or idea in a new light, try to include multiple senses--sight, sound, touch, and so on. Power Point is to be used sparingly--pictures are good, text is not good. Another important aspect in delivering a good talk is to edit, prepare, and practice the presentation in front of people ahead of time. It can take hundreds of hours to prepare and test out an attention-grabbing presentation. All that preparation helps to make the presentation seem spontaneous and authentic. I found the advice about public speaking to be very helpful. But I also found the descriptions of some of the best TED talks to be equally interesting. I didn't read this book--I listened to it as an audiobook. Multiple readers took on the roles of some of the TED talkers, and that gave the audiobook a nice, varied flavor. Highly recommended!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ken Rideout

    Here's the highlights (I confess for scanning through the backstories and anecdotes to extract these) Great presentations are Emotional, Novel, and Memorable: 1. Dig deep to identify your unique and meaningful connection to your topic 2. Tell stories to reach people's hearts and minds 3. Practice relentlessly and internalize your content so that you can deliver the presentation as comfortably as having a conversation with a close friend 4.Reveal information that's completely new to your audience, pac Here's the highlights (I confess for scanning through the backstories and anecdotes to extract these) Great presentations are Emotional, Novel, and Memorable: 1. Dig deep to identify your unique and meaningful connection to your topic 2. Tell stories to reach people's hearts and minds 3. Practice relentlessly and internalize your content so that you can deliver the presentation as comfortably as having a conversation with a close friend 4.Reveal information that's completely new to your audience, packaged differently, or offers a fresh and novel way to solve an old problem. 5. Deliver a shocking, impressive, or surprising moment that is so moving and memorable, it grabs the listener's attention and is remembered long after the presentation is over. 6. Lighten up with authentic humor. 7. Eighteen minutes is the ideal length of time for a presentation. If you must go longer build in soft breaks every 10 minutes. 8. Deliver presentations that touch more than one of the 5 senses. 9. Be authentic, open, and transparent.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne

    I am flying out this week to give a major presentation, and I'm nervous. I know that I'm a very successful speaker in some settings but this will be short and sans visuals. I will be seated. My work will be recorded. In general, this presentation does not play to my strengths. I ran into a copy of Carmine Gallo's (2014) Talk like TED at the right time – but initially didn't think so. Its introduction felt slick and empty. I thought this was going to be another vacuous book more focused on selling I am flying out this week to give a major presentation, and I'm nervous. I know that I'm a very successful speaker in some settings but this will be short and sans visuals. I will be seated. My work will be recorded. In general, this presentation does not play to my strengths. I ran into a copy of Carmine Gallo's (2014) Talk like TED at the right time – but initially didn't think so. Its introduction felt slick and empty. I thought this was going to be another vacuous book more focused on selling itself than ideas. I was wrong. Gallo skillfully analyzed especially successful TED talks, interviewed TED speakers about what they did and what they believed others did particularly well, and gave concrete advice and examples of his recommendations. I didn't buy all of his explanations for why things work – Gallo is a journalist and consultant rather than a researcher – but his recommendations are thoughtful and useful. What does Gallo recommend? Those of you who have watched hours of TED talks like me won't be surprised: speak from passion; use stories, humor, and pictures to engage your audience and to make your ideas clear; but be authentic. Quoting Bryan Stevenson: "You need data, facts, and analysis to challenge people, but you also need narrative to get people comfortable enough to care about the community that you are advocating for. Your audience needs to be willing to go with you on a journey” (p. 47). Gallo also describes behind-the-scene tools that will almost certainly be helpful. He suggests summarizing your ideas in 140 characters or less (distilling it to its essences): "If you can’t explain your big idea in 140 characters or less, keep working on your message" (pp. 130-131). He then suggests outlining your message by threes (easy to remember, both as presenter and audience). Gallo then recommends "striving for no more than 40 words in the first 10 slides. This will force you to think creatively about telling a memorable and engaging story instead of filling the slide with needless and distracting text. Kill bullet points on most of your slides" (p. 223). We (I) think about great presenters as naturals. He notes that Dr. Jill Bolte-Taylor, for example, rehearsed her presentation 200 times, which is why they "seem natural, authentic, animated, and conversational" (p. 87). Great presentations come from practice. Gallo ends with this advice: You don’t need luck to be an inspiring speaker. You need examples, techniques, passion, and practice. You also need courage—the courage to follow your passion, articulate your ideas simply, and express what makes your heart sing. (p. 248)Listen to him.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vaiibhav Nigam

    Somehow i had a high expectation from this book and it was completely ruined. I was simply turning the pages so i could find something insightful and was disappointed again and again. First of all the book should not be named as "TALK LIKE TED" rather it should be re-named as "WHAT TED SPEAKERS SPEAK". It says that great TED speakers have excellent body language, tone, etc etc without thoughts and words on how to improve it. It more feels like a "guide book" for TED talks than anything else.My H Somehow i had a high expectation from this book and it was completely ruined. I was simply turning the pages so i could find something insightful and was disappointed again and again. First of all the book should not be named as "TALK LIKE TED" rather it should be re-named as "WHAT TED SPEAKERS SPEAK". It says that great TED speakers have excellent body language, tone, etc etc without thoughts and words on how to improve it. It more feels like a "guide book" for TED talks than anything else.My Highlighter pen has remain un-employed because I am unable to find any words of wisdom which can be implemented.!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline

    Didn't finish. Reads like an annoying person's sales pitch.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Laleh

    I liked it, it was practical, and enjoyable to read, and gave you room to think about the things it suggested as opposed to just reading them. Having just finished it, I might not be able to state the 9 points off by heart, but I'm pretty sure I'll remember to use them the next time I'm preparing a presentation.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Heidi The Reader

    My husband is a world class debater and former forensic coach. I listened to this audio book to try to understand some of the methods that he seems to just intuitively know in order to improve my own public speaking skills. He heard some of the chapters and seemed to think that all of it was fairly obvious and well known information. I found a lot of it useful, but I have literally no background in public speaking. So, the moral of today's story is: if you already know how to do a great presenta My husband is a world class debater and former forensic coach. I listened to this audio book to try to understand some of the methods that he seems to just intuitively know in order to improve my own public speaking skills. He heard some of the chapters and seemed to think that all of it was fairly obvious and well known information. I found a lot of it useful, but I have literally no background in public speaking. So, the moral of today's story is: if you already know how to do a great presentation, then Talk Like TED might not be that interesting or ground breaking to you. If you're like me, and you have no idea what you're doing up there, Talk like TED is actually fairly helpful. If you enjoyed Talk like TED, you may enjoy some other books by TED authors like Judge This by Chip Kidd, The Art of Stillness: Adventures in Going Nowhere by Pico Ayer, or My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist's Personal Journey by Jill Bolte Taylor.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Duhart Vader

    This book is so well written that even the summaries of the presentations the author talks about are more impressive than the TED talks themselves. Totally worth reading.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    This book is a MUST read for any Speech teacher. It reinforced some things that I know to be true, and challenged me to take my expertise one step further. The best thing is that it inspired me to demand more from my college students. I have been using it through most of the semester, but finally finished all the chapters this morning. Yes, giving a speech is demanding, it is hard work, it is challenging, it is invigorating when you are successful, it can be terrifying, but if you do the work, y This book is a MUST read for any Speech teacher. It reinforced some things that I know to be true, and challenged me to take my expertise one step further. The best thing is that it inspired me to demand more from my college students. I have been using it through most of the semester, but finally finished all the chapters this morning. Yes, giving a speech is demanding, it is hard work, it is challenging, it is invigorating when you are successful, it can be terrifying, but if you do the work, you reap the rewards, and PRACTICE is essential. All the best do!

  12. 5 out of 5

    April Sarah

    While none of the ideas in this book are ground shaking or earth shattering, the way they are presented really hits home. It is one of those reads that at some point I will come back to just to refresh myself with the ideas.

  13. 4 out of 5

    W. Whalin

    I heard the audio version of this book cover to cover. The storytelling in this book is excellent. The detailed examples will help anyone who speaks in public. I enjoyed the writing in this book and recommend it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Quick & easy read. Excerpts from some of the best rated & most viewed Ted talks with pointers on how to keep an audience engaged and remember your talk.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tomas Ramanauskas

    Captain Obvious. You've read it before even if you didn't read that much about presentations.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kaixi Luo

    Couldn't get past the first chapter. I kept looking for some insights but all I got were buzzwords, some BS about passion and disjointed and out of context quotes from great speakers. Do not recommend.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bruno

    Agree with all the tips and tricks presented in this book. Motivated me to craft my presentations.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ev

    Basically: be passionate about your subject, open and interesting. The 250 pages could have been condensed to 50, max.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Pilar

    I found it a little bit tedious and repetitive. The book doesn't discover anything new, it just limits itself to describe famous TEDtalks while pointing out some facts and concepts. It would have been more instructive and interesting to watch those talks directly, and save myself some time.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Muthuvel

    The Science behind the most popular TED talks! I'd personally recommend this one because it took me a step ahead from where I was and what I I'd felt about public speaking!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Irfaan

    longer it needed to be, weaving lots of fluff around the concrete tips - but there's quite a nice tie in with TED talks where you can watch the talk and see how they break down specific techniques.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Richards

    Even if you’re not a public speaker, you will love this book (especially if you’re a writer), because it will point you to some really great TED talks. (TED stands for technology, education, and design.) Even though I don’t plan on public speaking any time before I graduate from college (too many irons in the fire), one thing Mr. Gallo said resonated with me, and that was that PowerPoint sucks. I wish my online instructors would use the TED template for teaching some of their material so I would Even if you’re not a public speaker, you will love this book (especially if you’re a writer), because it will point you to some really great TED talks. (TED stands for technology, education, and design.) Even though I don’t plan on public speaking any time before I graduate from college (too many irons in the fire), one thing Mr. Gallo said resonated with me, and that was that PowerPoint sucks. I wish my online instructors would use the TED template for teaching some of their material so I wouldn’t find myself spacing out during “lectures”. I’ve often found the text on PowerPoint slides to be distracting (like closed captions on television, even though background noise over dialogue forces me to resort to them); stunning visuals (or slides) should be used instead. It was how Al Gore convinced people of man-made global warming. However, even though Mr. Gallo claims that talks shouldn’t be more than 18 minutes, I’ve listened to professors and speakers for three hours, and, as long they were interesting and I had an intermission, I remained engaged. Think about it: How many men watch a four-hour football game or how many women binge-watch “Big Love”? If they can sit through that, they can sit through more than an 18-minute talk. Joel Osteen, a wildly popular, “pop” minister, often speaks well over that time frame. The problem isn’t with the length (albeit within reason), it’s with our attention-span. Maybe we need to learn how to focus on listening more and talking less. We are overstimulated as a society with our cell phones, we can’t just be. That said, I agreed that the objective of a talk should be able to be expressed in “Twitter time” (140 characters or less). Creativity does thrive under constraints, because I’ve found it easier to write for a deadline, a certain word count, or theme, as it gives you a framework. When I watched David Christian’s talk, “The History of our World”, I was left wanting more, but maybe a Ted Talk is supposed to leave us feeling that way, so we will explore the issue further. See: http://www.ted.com/talks/david_christ.... That talk led me to reading Stephen Hawking’s “The Brief Illustrated History of Time” (I don’t claim to understand everything in it, but even if you don’t, you will get something out of it; nevertheless, it’s a fascinating read). As for Susan Cain’s talk, “The Power of Introverts”, (https://www.ted.com/talks/susan_cain_...), it inspired me to read her book, being an introvert myself. I remember in school, if you were introverted, you were considered an outcast, except with other introverts, but I look at it this way: When you’re an introvert, you love your own company, and you’re less likely to be bored. Boredom is something I haven’t experienced since I was a child, and even then, I found my own way out of it. Maybe that’s why I loved making up stories, spending time with people who didn’t really exist. Another book I was inspired to check out was “The Book of Awesome” (see: http://1000awesomethings.com/the-top-... however, after seeing “picking your nose” on the list, I’m dubious (maybe he ran out of ideas?). I prefer Maria von Trapp’s “favorite things”, or maybe even Oprah’s, as I’m currently reading through some of her Book Club selections. When my cable went out for about a week, I’d felt more at peace than I had in awhile, for I’d grown weary of the talking heads and punditry. It was like a spell had been broken. I didn’t need to know what was going on at every minute of every day, and I hadn’t realized what a negative effect it had had on me. I find myself longing for the days when I was a little girl and news was a 30-minute primetime event. I remember growing up to the calm, comatose-inducing lull of C-SPAN at my maternal grandparents’ house. I dug out my old “Wings” collection and it was nice to laugh about silly things, rather than be entertained by “political theatre”. Sir Ken Robinson’s speech on education (https://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinso...) was my favorite (and not just because of the English accent). Large portions of his speech are included in the book, but it was nothing like listening to him give it. I’ve heard that poetry is best when read aloud, and now I know why. Sir Robinson’s speech only confirmed my belief that education is on the decline. Case in point: I will never forget my tenth-grade English teacher telling me the epic poem I wrote for our semester project (our theme that year was Greek mythology) was too creative. She gave me a C, and I can still remember her face when I showed her that I won first place in fiction in a regional writing contest (and this was at the age of 16). That said, she was a good sport and had me read it in class. It was one of the few times my shyness (now having matured into introvertedness) was forgotten. I believed in what I’d written, for someone else had believed in it, too. However, he was careful to say don’t just live inside your head. You have a body, too, that can do amazing things. Needless to say, I got more out of this book than mere information, which has led me to seek more information; it also inspired me to do a TED talk someday many, many years from now. When a book inspires you, that’s saying quite a bit. Furthermore, I learned more from reading this book than I did taking a Basic Speaking and Listening class at college. One of the things I agreed with the author about was that it isn’t wise to tell jokes unless you’re a comedian. Rather, weave anecdotes into your story/narrative. This goes for being a writer, as well, and I have to say that I don’t care for stand-up comedy, but I love (good) situation comedy—humor that arises organically through situations, with characters you get to know more than you do in a movie. I rarely ever tell a joke in any of my stories, because it takes you away from the story. The only time I’ve used a joke was through the voice of a young girl who fancies herself as a comedienne, where the jokes are intentionally lame, where the joke is simply a tool providing insight into the character and not about the joke itself. Mr. Gallo did promote TED speakers as much as he gave advice, but I didn’t mind. Though it sounds rather crass, we are all in sales now. We’re all in the business (or should be) of selling ourselves to an employer (also known as an interview). Many things sell themselves, but they have to be presented in the right way, which is what a TED talk does—it presents information in a fun, conversational way—not as a series of bullet points on PowerPoint, but through a multi-sensory experience. Stories that employ the use of metaphors and analogies are my favorite (after anecdotes). Even Jesus used parables to convey His message, and relate to His audience. Images, videos, quotes, and props, also add to the experience (and they don’t even have to be your own). A few tidbits from the book. The three components of inspiring presentation are (and forgive the bullet points): • Emotional—they should touch your heart • Novel—they should teach you something new • Memorable—they should present content in unforgettable ways According to Aristotle, the power of persuasion resided in three things: • Ethos: credibility • Logos: logic, data, statistics • Pathos: appealing to emotions I like to say I prefer movies that were made back during a time when people were more sophisticated than their technology, but believe it or not, people are getting smarter (p. 127). That alone gave me hope. I was also heartened to read that it’s never too late to learn something new (p. 33). “Neuroplasticity…as a person becomes an expert in a particular area….the areas of the brain associated with those skills actually grow.” Being an avid, lifelong learner, this made me realize I still have time to learn all the things I wish I’d learned as a child that my undomesticated goddess mother did not know how to do.

  23. 4 out of 5

    ASHLEY

    I was curious when choosing this book to see what it was about and how it might help me. I was pleasantly surprised at how much I loved it. The author discusses several successful TED talks and what makes them successful. I definitely learned some practices that I will try and use in the future.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Morgan

    Classic Gallo, a lot of overlap with the Steve Jobs book, but still excellent and worth every minute. Great for anyone wanting to do presentations of any type.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Robert Durgin

    What a rip-off! I was looking to talk like Ted Danson, but now I’m talking like Ted Nugent! I’ve alienated all of my friends and co-workers because I can’t stop informing them that I’ve come down with cat-scratch fever!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Eric Montag

    I have recently begun thinking more about improving my public speaking and presenting abilities, so I selected this book. The author uses a lot of examples from TED talk presenters to illustrate his 9 secrets, and that made the book very engaging. I will say that the focus of the book is mainly on creating and delivering a presentation that people will want to listen to, rather than dealing with the fear of public speaking. The author doesn't offer any advice like, "picture everyone in the audie I have recently begun thinking more about improving my public speaking and presenting abilities, so I selected this book. The author uses a lot of examples from TED talk presenters to illustrate his 9 secrets, and that made the book very engaging. I will say that the focus of the book is mainly on creating and delivering a presentation that people will want to listen to, rather than dealing with the fear of public speaking. The author doesn't offer any advice like, "picture everyone in the audience naked" or anything like that. If you are looking for a book that will help you calm physical anxiety symptoms related to public speaking, then you might want to select something else. But if you want a book that will help with improving your communication and delivery skills, then this book is definitely worth your time.

  27. 5 out of 5

    John

    How do those speakers get those TED talk so perfect? Well, Gallo lets you in on the TED talk rules: keep talks shorter than 18 minutes, don't name your talk with a title longer than 140 characters (yep, twitter rules), most of all tell a story. Overall, these are helpful hints and reminders for giving talks so people will listen. I listened to the audio version of this book (doesn't that seem natural?) and the only compliant I had with the audio book was whenever the author/reader gave an exampl How do those speakers get those TED talk so perfect? Well, Gallo lets you in on the TED talk rules: keep talks shorter than 18 minutes, don't name your talk with a title longer than 140 characters (yep, twitter rules), most of all tell a story. Overall, these are helpful hints and reminders for giving talks so people will listen. I listened to the audio version of this book (doesn't that seem natural?) and the only compliant I had with the audio book was whenever the author/reader gave an example of a TED, they didn't use the original TED talk snippet as an example, which would have been better than reading the talk's transcript. All in all, a book filled with good ideas for presenting a compelling talk.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    An easy fun read. More than anything it will make you want to sit on the couch and binge on a TED Talk marathon. Good read for any communicator.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sundarraj Kaushik

    A nice book for individuals who want to make a powerful presentation. It is repeated mentioned in the book that it is important to stick to 18 minutes for the presentation to be relevant to the audience. Anything more than that will be useless. The key suggestions are Bring in your inner emotion (it needs to be genuine not fake) 1. Unleash the master within - Bring out your complete knowledge of the topic in the 18 minutes. Squeeze and Condense the material till only the essence goes to the audience A nice book for individuals who want to make a powerful presentation. It is repeated mentioned in the book that it is important to stick to 18 minutes for the presentation to be relevant to the audience. Anything more than that will be useless. The key suggestions are Bring in your inner emotion (it needs to be genuine not fake) 1. Unleash the master within - Bring out your complete knowledge of the topic in the 18 minutes. Squeeze and Condense the material till only the essence goes to the audience. The essence needs to be strong. 2. Master the art of storytelling - Include stories, specially personal if possible or of someone who matters in the subject being spoken about. People tend to remember the essence on the basis of story. 3. Have a conversation - Don't make it an officious, formal, drab presentation. Speak as if you are having a conversation with another person. Be Novel 4. Teach me something new - Need to show something new to the audience or present something known in a novel way. 5. Delivery Jaw dropping moments: Speak about something shocking. Not something crass (could be gross depending on the expected impact), but something that will draw their attention to and something that they will not forget in a hurry. 6. Be lighthearted: Have some fun. The chemicals required by humans to remember better are triggered by laughter. Make it memorable 7. Stick to the 18 minute Rule - 18 minutes has been found to be the right length for a presentation. Anything more than this tends to tier the audience and anything less may be too short to fit in all the contents. 8. Paint a mental picture with multi-sensory Experiences - It is important to stimulate the senses of the audience. These simulations help the audience remember the topics better than just verbal delivery. Use photos, props, videos, audios and if possible smell and touch (at least talk about them vividly) to simulate the senses of the audience. Text on the presentation should be minimal. 9. Stay in Your Lane - Do not copy someone else. This does not help unless one is a professional mimic. It is important to do what one is convinced about in a way that one is comfortable with. One note of caution. This will work with an audience who have come with some interest in the topic that is being spoken about or is mature enough to listen to what the speaker has come to speak about. It will work when one wishes to provide information about a specific subject/topic, it is unlikely to work in situations where one is trying to teach a subject to the audience. One place where it jars is when it advises ("fake it if you have to") and then later it says be true and honest. It is contrary to the earlier advice.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Preston Smith

    “TED is where brilliant people go to hear brilliant people share their ideas" said Oprah Winfrey. Not only that, it is also the place where author, Carmine Gallo, discovered the 9 public speaking secrets used by some of the most brilliant presenters in TED’s history including: Amy Cuddy, Steve Jobs, Bill Gates and Bryan Stevenson. Each of whom has had his/her eighteen-minute presentation viewed over 2.5 million times. Since I had never seen a TED before, I watched all of the above as an indoctri “TED is where brilliant people go to hear brilliant people share their ideas" said Oprah Winfrey. Not only that, it is also the place where author, Carmine Gallo, discovered the 9 public speaking secrets used by some of the most brilliant presenters in TED’s history including: Amy Cuddy, Steve Jobs, Bill Gates and Bryan Stevenson. Each of whom has had his/her eighteen-minute presentation viewed over 2.5 million times. Since I had never seen a TED before, I watched all of the above as an indoctrination of sorts to acclimate myself to TED. I did so only after reading the entire book. I thoroughly enjoyed them all, but was upset at myself for being late to the party. A client told me about TED about five years ago and suggested I take a peak. I never took that peak. However, I think having read this book prior to watching a TED allowed me to identify the “9 secrets” Gallo discussed in his book and he was “spot-on.” The first secret and most important attribute for any public speaker is passion. The topic of your discussion must “make your heart sing” says Gallo. Ralph Waldo Emerson once said, “Nothing great has ever been achieved without enthusiasm.” This was easy to see in the likes of Amy Cuddy who trembled and shed a few tears as she told her story about moving on past a fatal car accident and graduating from college when everyone suggested she no longer had the aptitude to do so. Her message was on body language and it has been viewed over 28 million times, but it was her passion that stands out most. “The first step to inspiring others is to make sure you’re inspired yourself.” Now that you have the passion you must craft a story. Bryan Stevenson, founder of the Equal Justice Initiative, knows how to tell a story. He tells lots of stories during his speeches. He says that “you have to get folks to trust you.” And the way to do so is by telling stories that “get people to connect with you on a personal and emotional level.” I love the story Stevenson tells about his grandmother, who made him promise he would never take a sip of alcohol because he was “special.” He promised, and weeks later when his cousins snuck some alcohol into the woods so they could get drunk Stevenson said no. They asked was if it was because Grandma had told him he was “special.” They said it jokingly, but Stevenson did not drink on that day or any other for that matter. He is now fifty-two. A very funny and powerful story that connected him with over 2.5 million people. If you don’t have a story to tell Gallo suggests you tell a story about other people or tell a story about a brand. According to Gallo, secret number three, have a conversation, is all about the four elements of verbal delivery-rate, volume, pitch and pauses. Rate is the most important and should be between 150 to 160 words per minute. Volume, pitch and pauses are to be used the same way you would a highlighter, to emphasize key points. And don’t forget to use hand gestures while speaking. Walking around with your hands in your pockets makes viewers feel like you aren’t excited about your topic. Teach me something new, deliver jaw-dropping moments, and lighten-up are secrets four, five and six. Bill Gates does all of these well in his 2009 TED on Mosquitos, malaria and education. While discussing malaria he informed his audience about the deadliness of the disease and how a British soldier was responsible for finding out that mosquitos were its cause, thus eliminating the disease in all countries except poor ones. To bring home his point, he brought along a jar containing three mosquitos. He set them free telling his audience, “There’s no reason why poor people should be the only ones to suffer.” He provided a jaw-dropping moment with the mosquitos and lightened his audience up with the quote. The presentation went viral in a matter of hours. If you aren’t funny then find a quote or use funny pictures. Analogies and metaphors are also good ways to add humor. “Humor lowers defenses, making your audience more receptive to your message. It also makes you seem more likable, and people are more willing to do business with you or support someone they like.” Secret number seven was the ah-ha moment for me. Eighteen minutes or less. That’s right, your presentation is best if you stick to the 18-minute rule. “Albert Einstein once said, ‘If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough.’” Gallo says the thing to do is to break your presentation into three parts because, “‘in writing and speaking, three is more satisfying than any other number. Jefferson used it, “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.’” President Obama used it, “Yes we can.” The bible uses it, “the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.” And you should too. Rounding out the list of 9-public speaking secrets with eight and nine: paint a mental picture with multisensory moments and stay in your lane. Staying in your lane was the shortest chapter and was just a reminder to be authentic. I think this was pretty much covered in chapter 1 so I’ll move on to painting a mental picture with multisensory moments. This idea is all about appealing to as many senses as possible. Gallo asks us to picture pitching a new product or service and how difficult it can be with an audience who has little firsthand knowledge. Appeal to their senses by allowing your audience to touch, smell, or view a picture of your product. If you do one of these then you will be much more likely to increase engagement and/or sales. We respond better and recall better when at least three senses are engaged. So there you have it. Speaking made easy. Next time you have to give a presentation just remember these steps and you will be sure to wow your audience, get your point across emotionally and emphatically and perhaps change a few lives at the same time. Never let the thought of public speaking terrorize you again.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.