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Operación Rainbow

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Over the course of nine novels, Tom Clancy’s “genius for big, compelling plots” and his “natural narrative gift” (The New York Times Magazine) have mesmerized hundreds of millions of readers and established him as one of the preeminent storytellers of our time. Rainbow Six, however, goes beyond anything he has done before.At its heart is John Clark, the ex-Navy SEAL of Wit Over the course of nine novels, Tom Clancy’s “genius for big, compelling plots” and his “natural narrative gift” (The New York Times Magazine) have mesmerized hundreds of millions of readers and established him as one of the preeminent storytellers of our time. Rainbow Six, however, goes beyond anything he has done before.At its heart is John Clark, the ex-Navy SEAL of Without Remorse, well known from several of Clancy's novels as a master of secret operational missions. Whether hunting warlords in Japan, druglords in Colombia, or nuclear terrorists in the United States, Clark is efficient and deadly, but even he has ghosts in his past, demons that must be exorcised. And nothing is more demonic than the peril he must face in Rainbow Six.Newly named the head of an international task force dedicated to combating terrorism, Clark is looking forward to getting his teeth into a new mission, but the opportunities start coming thicker and faster than anyone could have expected: an incident at a Swiss bank, the kidnapping of an international trader in Germany, a terrible raid on an amusement park in Spain.Each episode seems separate, discrete, yet the timing disturbs Clark. Is there a connection? Is he being tested? With the help of his close associates, executive officer Alistair Stanley and strike team leaders Domingo Chavez and Peter Covington, Clark tries to figure out where all this activity is heading, but there is no way to predict the real threat: a group of terrorists like none the world has ever encountered, a band of men and women so extreme that their success could literally mean the end of life on this earth as we know it.


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Over the course of nine novels, Tom Clancy’s “genius for big, compelling plots” and his “natural narrative gift” (The New York Times Magazine) have mesmerized hundreds of millions of readers and established him as one of the preeminent storytellers of our time. Rainbow Six, however, goes beyond anything he has done before.At its heart is John Clark, the ex-Navy SEAL of Wit Over the course of nine novels, Tom Clancy’s “genius for big, compelling plots” and his “natural narrative gift” (The New York Times Magazine) have mesmerized hundreds of millions of readers and established him as one of the preeminent storytellers of our time. Rainbow Six, however, goes beyond anything he has done before.At its heart is John Clark, the ex-Navy SEAL of Without Remorse, well known from several of Clancy's novels as a master of secret operational missions. Whether hunting warlords in Japan, druglords in Colombia, or nuclear terrorists in the United States, Clark is efficient and deadly, but even he has ghosts in his past, demons that must be exorcised. And nothing is more demonic than the peril he must face in Rainbow Six.Newly named the head of an international task force dedicated to combating terrorism, Clark is looking forward to getting his teeth into a new mission, but the opportunities start coming thicker and faster than anyone could have expected: an incident at a Swiss bank, the kidnapping of an international trader in Germany, a terrible raid on an amusement park in Spain.Each episode seems separate, discrete, yet the timing disturbs Clark. Is there a connection? Is he being tested? With the help of his close associates, executive officer Alistair Stanley and strike team leaders Domingo Chavez and Peter Covington, Clark tries to figure out where all this activity is heading, but there is no way to predict the real threat: a group of terrorists like none the world has ever encountered, a band of men and women so extreme that their success could literally mean the end of life on this earth as we know it.

30 review for Operación Rainbow

  1. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    Tommy Clancy is an impressive story-teller and I really like his work....BUT he’s also a major word glutton and very promiscuous with regards to the sheer volume of prose he pours into each tale. The man loves, loves, looooooooves him some letters and it seems he will do nothing in 5 pages of text if he can possibly coax 10 or 15 out of it. A bit more brevity if you please, sir. That said, Clancy is a grandmaster of the big, global threatening, spy-guy thriller and he packs plenty of worthy into Tommy Clancy is an impressive story-teller and I really like his work....BUT he’s also a major word glutton and very promiscuous with regards to the sheer volume of prose he pours into each tale. The man loves, loves, looooooooves him some letters and it seems he will do nothing in 5 pages of text if he can possibly coax 10 or 15 out of it. A bit more brevity if you please, sir. That said, Clancy is a grandmaster of the big, global threatening, spy-guy thriller and he packs plenty of worthy into the narrative despite the occasional bout of overabundance. Just make sure when you pick up one of his tomes that you’re prepared for a massive, sprawling epic that spends considerable time just enjoying the surroundings before marching into the promised land. It’s a good trip, but it travels the scenic route to get there. PLOT SUMMARY John Clark (aka Super Spook Extraordinaire) has been tapped by his buddy, President Jack Ryan, to head up a new top secret, multi-national, counter-terrorist group called Rainbow to deal with post cold war threats to the good people of Earth. Headquartered in the U.K. and comprised of the crème-de la crème of elite, mega badasses from the U.S. and Europe, Rainbow is the ultimate squad of no-nonsense, life takers out to bring the pain to those that would dare cause trouble for the freedom loving world. On the other side of Rainbow is an ex-KGB heavy working for an extreme group of gaia-loving, radical Eco-terrorists looking to perpetrate some real nasty on the Planet’s most environmentally offensive species (...and no, we aren’t talking farting cows here). I don’t want to spoil the central goal of the bad guys are but it is well-planned, well-funded and seriously scary. It is also complex and includes as part of the overall scheme some “old guard” terrorist operations that spotlight the new Rainbow group, some secret medical experiments on the homeless people and security at the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games. MY THOUGHTS After reading a bunch of Clancy around the time the movie version of The Hunt for Red October was released, this was my first novel of his in over 10 years. I liked it. I wasn’t quite as blown away by this one as I have been in the past and I think that is less a reflection of the story (which was among his best) and more an indication that my reading tastes have evolved and that the thriller genre has caught up to Clancy who at one point was miles ahead of the crowd. My only real gripe goes back to my introductory reference to Clancy’s word whoring and page count promiscuity. The book was just toooooooooooo loooooooooong for me given the events of the novel. Tommy could’ve written a 500 page book (rather than almost 1000) and lost none of the plot or narrative detail. It never got so bad that I was actually frustrated, but it got close a few times. That page bloat cost the book a star from me. However, despite the plot plod, the story is still wonderfully done and Clancy has a real gift for complex, well-thought out scenarios and both the good and bad guys do some very interesting things. His attention to detail is also as sharp as ever. My favorite this about Clancy’s stories are his characters which stand out among others in the genre for their perfect balance between true blue patriotism, inner decency and the willingness to take the gloves off and put a fatal hurting on the baddies. Nobody does this kind of character better and both Jack Ryan and John Clark are among my favorite literary leading men of all time. Overall, a good solid thriller that could have been made more enjoyable with a reduced thickness. Thus 3.0 stars for what in many respects was a 4 star story. Still, recommended for fans of the genre.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    What a trip! Tom Clancy, arguably (along with Larry Bond) the biggest game-changer in the history of the technothriller, proves that he can deliver comedy gold with this droll self-parody. Ex-Navy SEAL and super-duper CIA legend John Clark, still hurting under his warrior's iron-hard facade from the brutal and plot-driving death of every woman he has ever known in his entire life, is put in charge of a top-secret NATO counter-terrorist team. Clark, his demeanor increasingly reminiscent of Uncle What a trip! Tom Clancy, arguably (along with Larry Bond) the biggest game-changer in the history of the technothriller, proves that he can deliver comedy gold with this droll self-parody. Ex-Navy SEAL and super-duper CIA legend John Clark, still hurting under his warrior's iron-hard facade from the brutal and plot-driving death of every woman he has ever known in his entire life, is put in charge of a top-secret NATO counter-terrorist team. Clark, his demeanor increasingly reminiscent of Uncle Duke from Doonesbury, assembles a crew of multinational stereotypes so flat they could fit into business envelopes. Clark starts with his son-in-law "Ding" Chavez, a veteran of other Clancy novels who used to be interesting but seems to have gotten over it. Clancy cranks up the hilarity by allowing this team to launch cross-border operations with the eager blessing of every government involved... just like real life! Additional comedy comes from the notion that the Rainbow project is "blacker than black" on the U.S. side of the pond, a secret known only to gods and Ubermensch, and yet can be called in by the governments of Switzerland, Spain, and Austria at the drop of a hat. Oh, the trenchant sarcasm of Clancy's portrayal of these helpless Euro-wuss bureaucrats, pathetically eager to let a team led and dominated by American personnel run around shooting things up on their own turf! The way the terrorist scenarios play out in a ludicrously linear fashion, ramping up in challenges and complexity like video game levels, is also a deft parodic touch. All in all, this book is so thunderously dull, its moral questions so elementary, its politics so spavined, its protagonists such jut-jawed spelunkers up their own buttholes, I have to applaud the author's divine sense of irony and... wait, what? This book wasn't meant to be satire?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brook Bakay

    This is a terribly lazy book. It is 900 pages and should be about 200. And while there are long descriptions of gun cleaning and men's showers, the thing that got me most was the repetition. Every time Clancy comes back to a character, he gives us the same details about him. "Tim Noonan had come to Rainbow from the FBI. He was a tech guy but he wanted to get in the field and he spent a lot of time at the range. He was as good with a handgun as any of the other men." (x4!) This tremendous repetit This is a terribly lazy book. It is 900 pages and should be about 200. And while there are long descriptions of gun cleaning and men's showers, the thing that got me most was the repetition. Every time Clancy comes back to a character, he gives us the same details about him. "Tim Noonan had come to Rainbow from the FBI. He was a tech guy but he wanted to get in the field and he spent a lot of time at the range. He was as good with a handgun as any of the other men." (x4!) This tremendous repetition isn't limited to characters, either. It is as if he designed the book to be skimmed: "Don't worry if you miss anything, you'll have four or five more shots at it." Rainbow Six needed an editor. Then there is the dialogue. British characters have been known to say more than "Quite". The characterization of the terrorists is laughably thin. There are lots of true believers out there, and it would have been fairly easy to craft some authentic seeming terrorists, but he couldn't be bothered. Seemingly every line of terrorist dogma is appended with a wink as the they constantly contradict themselves. It seemed as if his anti-environmentalist message got in the way of his characterization. And there is no need for that - it is possible to write believable ecoterrorists. Then again, the military people I've known don't talk like Clancy's characters either. "Who's running that?" "Johnson out of Fort Bragg." "Good man." "Sure is." The set pieces are engaging however, but they are just too few and far between. Someone should really release an abridged version of Rainbow Six. I plan to read one of the earlier books -- Hunt For Red October or Red Storm Rising -- before I write him off entirely. This one is not recommended.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steve Visel

    Extrajudicial murder for fun and profit. I've been a longtime fan of Tom Clancy, even though he never met an adjective or adverb that he didn't like. Each of his books is exactly 1/3 too long. In some respects this is the best written book of the Clancy canon. On the other hand, the resolution of this story turned my stomach. The resolution of the plot left a tricky legal problem to deal with. Rather then solve the issue, Clancy uses his characters to murder everyone involved. This one has put m Extrajudicial murder for fun and profit. I've been a longtime fan of Tom Clancy, even though he never met an adjective or adverb that he didn't like. Each of his books is exactly 1/3 too long. In some respects this is the best written book of the Clancy canon. On the other hand, the resolution of this story turned my stomach. The resolution of the plot left a tricky legal problem to deal with. Rather then solve the issue, Clancy uses his characters to murder everyone involved. This one has put me off Clancy for good. Good riddance.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alec

    I chose Tom Clancy's Rainbow six because of my favoring of books militaristic in nature. Rainbow six was no let down; The story features John Clark, an ex-Navy SEAL, leading a multinational group of counter terrorist experts from different countries. The group encounters multiple terror attacks, dealing with each one with precision and professionalism. Later, they learn that one Russian agent was responsible for these attacks. The Russian agent Popov soon defects after learning about his client' I chose Tom Clancy's Rainbow six because of my favoring of books militaristic in nature. Rainbow six was no let down; The story features John Clark, an ex-Navy SEAL, leading a multinational group of counter terrorist experts from different countries. The group encounters multiple terror attacks, dealing with each one with precision and professionalism. Later, they learn that one Russian agent was responsible for these attacks. The Russian agent Popov soon defects after learning about his client's business with biological weapons of mass destruction, used to wipe out earth's populace just because of their harm to the environment, and decides to warn Rainbow. My favorite quote is "My name's Clark and I suppose I'm the boss here." This quote gives of a supposed feeling of control that a group like Rainbow has over things. The book is written in third person omniscient point of view. The writing style is extremely descriptive and offers constant point of view changes. I enjoyed this book because of it's pure action and suspense. I would recommend this book to anyone who loves action books/movies/games.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Owen Yeasting

    Rainbow Six has one of the most amazing plots I've ever seen in a book. Tom Clancy bends the seemly irrelevant beginning all the way around to ultimate climax of the story. My mind was truely blown when I got to the end of this absolutely stunning book. Now, Rainbow Six isn't a page turner all the way through, but there are some very suspensful chapters.If you keep with it for about a hundred pages, you won't be able to put down. Clancy is an amazing writer, and with all his military access, he Rainbow Six has one of the most amazing plots I've ever seen in a book. Tom Clancy bends the seemly irrelevant beginning all the way around to ultimate climax of the story. My mind was truely blown when I got to the end of this absolutely stunning book. Now, Rainbow Six isn't a page turner all the way through, but there are some very suspensful chapters.If you keep with it for about a hundred pages, you won't be able to put down. Clancy is an amazing writer, and with all his military access, he was able to make the book really authentic. All the equipment and training the soldiers do is right on the mark.I It was very enjoyable and hard to put down. Clancy really nailed it this time around. I would recommend this book all mature young adults, but it is not for people who can't handle graphic violence. The author is very descriptive, and it is a counter-terrorism book. Besides that, Rainbow Six was a wonderful and exciting story that kept me reading until the end.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Zachary Marciano

    This is honestly one of the best books I have ever read, and I haven't even finished the book yet. However I wouldn't recommend this book to everyone. The weak stomached should probably refrain from picking up this book due to the gruesome descriptions and depictions the acclaimed author and ex-NAVY SEAL gives during the book. One of the main reasons why I really kike this book is because a clear and vivid image of what is going on can be created so easily and the strategy that is behind every m This is honestly one of the best books I have ever read, and I haven't even finished the book yet. However I wouldn't recommend this book to everyone. The weak stomached should probably refrain from picking up this book due to the gruesome descriptions and depictions the acclaimed author and ex-NAVY SEAL gives during the book. One of the main reasons why I really kike this book is because a clear and vivid image of what is going on can be created so easily and the strategy that is behind every move that the team makes. Basically the book is about a secret special forces organization called "Rainbow" due to their objective which is protecting countries on an international scale, from everything; bank robbers to full blown terrorists. The "Six" part of the title comes from the organizations leader, whose codename is "Six." However, the story is definitely not just based around blood and gore, it was a deep underlying conspiracy mystery that entangles, European terrorists and even corrupt biochemical lab physicians. On the whole so, far not one thing in this book has not had a hint of some literary device and it very creative. To be Continued.....

  8. 4 out of 5

    Asghar Abbas

    Rainbow Six has a different connotation now. Damn, Clancy wrote thick novels, better watch out Sideshow Bob, haha.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bryce

    This heart pounding thriller is set in England and tells the story of an intelligence agency and a special air service called Rainbow. Soon after its establishment a bank in Switzerland is robbed and they are sent in to handle the situation. They are successful at getting inside the bank and executing terrorist to stop the death of innocent civilians. Soon after, german terrorists obtain fake codes for the international trading markets. Rainbow sends out disguised shooters and they handle the si This heart pounding thriller is set in England and tells the story of an intelligence agency and a special air service called Rainbow. Soon after its establishment a bank in Switzerland is robbed and they are sent in to handle the situation. They are successful at getting inside the bank and executing terrorist to stop the death of innocent civilians. Soon after, german terrorists obtain fake codes for the international trading markets. Rainbow sends out disguised shooters and they handle the situation. The book goes through a number of terrorist encounters and describes how rainbow and its two teams handle them. After the hideout of the eco-terrorists is discovered rainbow is sent to it and kills them with a few survivors left naked to die and "reconnect with nature." This book was a wild thriller and anyone looking for action and military strategy should read it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Belcher

    One of my favorite Clancy novels, right behind Without Remorse. John Clark faces challenges he never faced before, commanding troops without taking part of the operations. Domingo Chaves, the fiery Latino leads Team Two on missions he never had dreamed about in his time with his Light Infantry Unit from Clear and Present Danger. This fast paced, roller coaster ride of excitement takes us into the life of Special Operators and their struggle to save lives of innocent people, and to end the lives One of my favorite Clancy novels, right behind Without Remorse. John Clark faces challenges he never faced before, commanding troops without taking part of the operations. Domingo Chaves, the fiery Latino leads Team Two on missions he never had dreamed about in his time with his Light Infantry Unit from Clear and Present Danger. This fast paced, roller coaster ride of excitement takes us into the life of Special Operators and their struggle to save lives of innocent people, and to end the lives of those who threaten them. From a bank robbery, to a home invasion, to terrorist taking children hostage in a Spanish Theme Park, to and attack on Rainbow’s own people, Clark is in charge, and Chavez is charged and ready to kill.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Goodness Clancy gets so bogged down in details. 5 or 6 long pages without dialogue just bores me to death. It got to where I skimmed a ton of the pages and didn't miss a thing. Still always knew what was going on. The action scenes are splendid and worth reading. Just speed read half the book and its worthwhile.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Apparently that piece of advice given to new novelists not to 'head hop' between many points of view is not a hard and fast rule (like most pieces of advice given on writing). This book jumps between a dizzying array of players, giving us an insider view of each terrorist action as it unfolds, and is squashed by the might boots of the Rainbow team. Clancy makes sure we know he is an insider with detailed information about guns, ammo, combat, and field craft. However, despite spending 890 pages wi Apparently that piece of advice given to new novelists not to 'head hop' between many points of view is not a hard and fast rule (like most pieces of advice given on writing). This book jumps between a dizzying array of players, giving us an insider view of each terrorist action as it unfolds, and is squashed by the might boots of the Rainbow team. Clancy makes sure we know he is an insider with detailed information about guns, ammo, combat, and field craft. However, despite spending 890 pages with the characters I cared very little. Even when Sandy and Patsy are in mortal peril, and when the survival of humanity hangs by a thread I felt unmoved by the action. Not that the action wasn't well written, but it wasn't visceral. It was obvious that the good guys would win, and the bad guys would fail. The only surprises were in how things were going to play out exactly and when people would explode into bloodied gore from the suppressed hollow point rounds. Like many thrillers it suffers from flat characterization in favor of flashy plot points and terrible abstract danger for everyone instead of specific danger to specific (and cared for) characters. Reading a book written in the 90's about terrorism in 2016 is an interesting experience. The assumptions are different, both of the motivation of terrorists and the perceptions of the reader which gives the book an almost explanatory tone. This tone carries with it a faith in masculine institutions like the CIA to protect hapless citizens from terrorism with little regard for the causes of terrorism or consequences of the repeated conflicts. Clancy's assurances that he is an experienced insider lead me to believe this is the attitude of many of the soldiers and officers working in the CIA, FBI, and armed forces of today. Yet, it is a piece of fiction and I wonder if this received view is actually accurate.

  13. 4 out of 5

    C

    Clancy's later books are...entirely predictable. I mean, it's not like the ending of "Hunt for Red October" came as a mind-blowing surprise or anything, but in "Rainbow Six" and "The Bear and the Dragon", especially, it seems that he relies on the repetition of phrases/ideas in order to get a high page count. The constant political proselytizing also got old. Yes, we understand: people who care about the environment are deluded murdering psychopaths; drilling for oil is Alaska is the most patriot Clancy's later books are...entirely predictable. I mean, it's not like the ending of "Hunt for Red October" came as a mind-blowing surprise or anything, but in "Rainbow Six" and "The Bear and the Dragon", especially, it seems that he relies on the repetition of phrases/ideas in order to get a high page count. The constant political proselytizing also got old. Yes, we understand: people who care about the environment are deluded murdering psychopaths; drilling for oil is Alaska is the most patriotic and awesome thing ever; the military is full of people who have PhD's from elite universities. Give it a rest.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    This story would be better with editing. Too many unnecessary written words had me at times falling asleep and dulled some of this novel. 5 of 10 stars

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    DNF. Just wasn't my thing.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steven Jr.

    After not having read it in years, Rainbow Six is a perfect example of Clancy's strengths and flaws. His strengths reside in his thorough technical research and plotting, while his flaws reside in character development, dialogue, and forgetting that he has created his own universe and creating inconsistencies between the Clancyverse and the real world. It's also an interesting looking glass into what was thought to be the threats on the horizon. Clancy seemed to put jihadists on the backburner an After not having read it in years, Rainbow Six is a perfect example of Clancy's strengths and flaws. His strengths reside in his thorough technical research and plotting, while his flaws reside in character development, dialogue, and forgetting that he has created his own universe and creating inconsistencies between the Clancyverse and the real world. It's also an interesting looking glass into what was thought to be the threats on the horizon. Clancy seemed to put jihadists on the backburner and thought Marxist elements and environmental extremists would be much more active. There's also the thing about how he claims special ops don't jump out of planes and prefer helicopters. While they do prefer helicopters, HALO/HAHO insertions are still done from time to time, which is why they maintain that skill set. Curious how he downplayed that thoroughly. Still, entertaining read all around.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

    The action scenes in Rainbow Six are excellent. Made up primarily of hostage-taking scenes, they are tense and exciting, and Clancy's writing conveys the urgency of the situation and the concerns of the protagonists well. They are spread evenly throughout the book, and they're all gripping and entertaining. Outside of the action scenes, Clancy's prose is serviceable, for the most part, but marred by repetition, poor flow, and a tendency to ramble. One almost gets a feeling of deja vu at some poin The action scenes in Rainbow Six are excellent. Made up primarily of hostage-taking scenes, they are tense and exciting, and Clancy's writing conveys the urgency of the situation and the concerns of the protagonists well. They are spread evenly throughout the book, and they're all gripping and entertaining. Outside of the action scenes, Clancy's prose is serviceable, for the most part, but marred by repetition, poor flow, and a tendency to ramble. One almost gets a feeling of deja vu at some points, when certain passages seem to be cut-and-pasted from one section of the book to another. His transitions between scenes are sometimes a bit rough, and he changes perspectives too abruptly, sometimes doing it in the middle of a paragraph. The characters tend to be broad stereotypes, and they never display any character development or growth, but that's typical for this type of fiction. The plot is interesting, but has a few technical holes in it. That wouldn't normally affect my enjoyment of a novel, but Clancy's reputation is built (in part) on the detail level of his books, so the errors I could recognize (specifically relating to the internet) are bothersome. The finish of the story is a little disappointing. I don't want to spoil the ending, but after a steady build-up throughout the story, with each mission and encounter getting tougher and tougher, the last two missions that Rainbow completes are too easy and pat to be rewarding. After wading through nearly 900 pages, I would have appreciated a bigger payoff. All in all, a nice action story, and a good bit of escapism, but it's too long, has too many dull spots, and lacks the big finish it needs to be really satisfying.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brett

    Another serving of jinjoism and macho pablum from Tom Clancy. This book is essentially a sequeal to Without Remorse, and very similar thematically to that book. It features the same main character, John Clark and includes a bunch of revenge killing by a group of amoral special forces soldiers. This doesn't so much illustrate the ambiguity of military violence though, since all the characters seem to be unable to reflect on their actions and instead mouth idiot platitudes about serving God and co Another serving of jinjoism and macho pablum from Tom Clancy. This book is essentially a sequeal to Without Remorse, and very similar thematically to that book. It features the same main character, John Clark and includes a bunch of revenge killing by a group of amoral special forces soldiers. This doesn't so much illustrate the ambiguity of military violence though, since all the characters seem to be unable to reflect on their actions and instead mouth idiot platitudes about serving God and country. The plot, if you care, revolves around a bunch of eco-terrorists that plan to wipe out the world with the ebola virus, to return to a state of nature. Lame. This is the second novel in a row by Clancy where characters try to spread the ebola virus to an unsuspecting population. Clancy's characters are impossible to tell apart and no "good guy" is ever killed or injured except for a couple of minor characters. Nonetheless, this book is better than Executive Orders. For one thing, it's shorter (though still over 900 pages). It's also got the ideological nonsense toned down somewhat, though it's still present way too much. I guess the reason it gets two stars instead of one is that the hostage situations that occur in the first half of the book do generate some tension. But it's really useless to review Clancy at this point; you know if you like to read this stuff and know more or less what you're getting yourself into. As far as Clancy books go, this one seems to fall right about in the middle of the pack.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Pearson

    This is my favourite of the Clancy books that feature the recurring characters, in this case it's John Clark and Ding!!! And with the subject of Counter-Terrorism. It was also my first Clancy book, and after reading this was hooked! I started reading the Tom Clancy series in order, and every book so far has been excellent. I coudn't put this book down - one of the tensest Clancy books I've read. The buildups to the meticulously planned counter-terrorist action scenes were some of the best I've re This is my favourite of the Clancy books that feature the recurring characters, in this case it's John Clark and Ding!!! And with the subject of Counter-Terrorism. It was also my first Clancy book, and after reading this was hooked! I started reading the Tom Clancy series in order, and every book so far has been excellent. I coudn't put this book down - one of the tensest Clancy books I've read. The buildups to the meticulously planned counter-terrorist action scenes were some of the best I've read. Clancy runs a number of seemingly unrelated stories in this book, which come together throughout the book. Full of everything that makes a Clancy book genius, action, character development, military knowledge, tactics, politics, world takeovers, being on the brink of World War Three and chilling plots - the situations in his books do tend to occur at some point not long after his book comes out!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    If you've made it this far into the "Jack Ryan Universe" you won't be disappointed!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Oliver

    I’ve never felt the need to read any military-themed action adventures before - I’m not even interested in shooting games or things like that - but my father and brother both read Tom Clancy, and they aren’t gun fanatics or bodybuilders (which I’d always stereotyped as Clancy’s main demographic for some reason - maybe because of the videogame); and I recently found out one of my coworkers (who also isn’t into shooting things or pumping iron) also reads a lot of Clancy, so I decided I should stop I’ve never felt the need to read any military-themed action adventures before - I’m not even interested in shooting games or things like that - but my father and brother both read Tom Clancy, and they aren’t gun fanatics or bodybuilders (which I’d always stereotyped as Clancy’s main demographic for some reason - maybe because of the videogame); and I recently found out one of my coworkers (who also isn’t into shooting things or pumping iron) also reads a lot of Clancy, so I decided I should stop being presumptuous and give him a try. While there is some of that overly-macho, testosterone-filled “bro” talk, that personality trait of the Rainbow Six members was actually really toned down. In fact, they’re all family men, and very professional about their work. It also turns out that Tom Clancy is actually a huge history and military buff (I might have been the only person who didn’t know that - don’t judge me), so instead of just being a lot of shooting and blowing things up, the apparent research he put into the book really makes it seem it was written by someone on the inside. I obviously don’t know much about covert operations and combat tactics, but it all seemed very realistic and accurate. Let’s talk a little more about all the research and details in the book, though. Clancy makes a point to include the model of everything from guns to aircrafts - and that’s fine; I’m sure there are weapons buffs who care about that - but I have to draw the line at making a point to tell me what kind of laptop the tech guy uses. Does anyone really need to know that the Noonan uses an Apple PowerBook? Sometimes it feels like Clancy put more time and thought into describing the hardware than the crew. Sure we get a little bit of insight on characters like John Clark and Domingo Chavez, but even a lot of that is just the same thing repeated over and over again. Clancy tells you more than once that John Clark is getting a little too old to be out in the field, but is uncomfortable being a “suit,” and that “Ding” Chavez is a competent squad leader but a little self-conscious about his skills compared to his troops. And the redundancy isn’t limited to characters either, there are several instances of recycled phrases… (e.g. “…squeezing off the burst as routinely as zipping his pants after taking a leak,” p. 91; “He’d zapped a guy the previous night, just as fast and automatic an action as zipping his zipper,” p 107; “He’d killed men with his own hand, and done it as casually as zipping his fly,” p. 238. <- Really? Is that the standard for nonchalant behavior?) …and reiterations and recaps (e.g. “It was somewhat unsatisfying that others got the credit for his successful mission, but that was the whole point of Rainbow…,” p. 88; “The front page had a story on the previous day’s events in Bern… The Telegraph’s correspondent must have had good contacts with the cops…whom he gave credit for the takedown. Well, that was okay. Rainbow was supposed to remain black,” p. 108) … which make a lot of sentences/paragraphs just seem like filler. I mean, seriously, how many times does the reader need to be reminded that the crew is "perfect" and that they actually can’t get any better but have to keep it up just so they don’t lose their edge? Not that the first 15 chapters are “boring,” but they are a fairly formulaic series of terrorist attacks foiled by the Rainbow Six counterterrorist team, as the more mysterious laboratory tests sections haven’t been that developed quite yet. Then, in chapter 16, the novel becomes less shooting and more sneaking. The espionage element is far more interesting, and the book as a whole becomes much more suspenseful as a result, but it also yields some less-than-believable moments. First off, how plausible is it that (view spoiler)[Popov would only have to wait less than the length of a football game in the first bar he tried before he heard someone talking about a top secret military base? And wouldn’t the guy, plumber or not, have been briefed on not discussing these things with civilians? Or bringing them onto the actual base? Even if the guy is going to sell you some real swell Rigid wrenches? And then the offered explanation for how Popov gets on the base without so much as a glance from any of the security guards is that… they’re British? Isn’t this supposed be a “blacker than black” organization (hide spoiler)] ? And it’s not only the good guys! These scientists (view spoiler)[didn’t think to password-protect their computers until after one of their patients moseyed on out of her unlocked room and sent an email from the unmonitored desktop? I password protect my laptop, and I’m not even manufacturing a super virus to wipe out most of the human race (hide spoiler)] . And then, later, Popov (view spoiler)[absent-mindedly tosses his fake passport and credit cards into a trashcan at the airport? What about all that “The KGB knew how to train its people” (p. 654) talk? Hm? What? He (hide spoiler)] was jet-lagged? Oh, okay, that makes sense. I get it, people slip up, even professionals like FBI anti-terrorist specialists and intelligence officers. But Clancy spends so much time making everyone sound so professional, skilled, and competent… but the nature and number of things that everyone overlooked (password-protecting computers, a helicopter, a siren for Noonan’s car, etc.) seem like a stretch. What’s more, the plot only moves ahead because of just how big of a group of blundering idiots these administrations appear to be. And this is a really small gripe, but why include the sentence, “It was amazing how large America was, Dmitriy Arkadyevich thought.”?? In all of his research did Clancy overlook the fact that Russia (Arkadyevich’s homeland) is nearly twice as big as America (17.1 million km2, compared to 9.857 million km2)? I’d be lying, though, if I said I wasn’t thoroughly entertained nearly the whole time. I just think more time could have been spent on developing the characters and/or figuring out a better way to come to the same ending without relying entirely on obvious mistakes that seem pretty unlikely to have been made by professionals of this caliber. Three stars seems too low, but I wouldn't say I "really liked it either," which means I can't exactly give it four either. Let's call it 3.5.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Owen

    Rainbow Six Owen Wahl 8-30-18 Rainbow Six by Tom Clancy is a continuation in the John Clark series by Tom Clancy. Tom Clancy is a top secret FBI agent who is offered to become the Top Dog for a brand new operation called Rainbow Six. R6 for short is a multinational anti terrorism group who all have a very particular set of skills. Their mission is to eliminate a new group of terrorists who recently have been on the uprise. Follow John Clark and his best friend Ding Chavez lead their teams through B Rainbow Six Owen Wahl 8-30-18 Rainbow Six by Tom Clancy is a continuation in the John Clark series by Tom Clancy. Tom Clancy is a top secret FBI agent who is offered to become the Top Dog for a brand new operation called Rainbow Six. R6 for short is a multinational anti terrorism group who all have a very particular set of skills. Their mission is to eliminate a new group of terrorists who recently have been on the uprise. Follow John Clark and his best friend Ding Chavez lead their teams through Bank Robberies, Hostage situations, and Bomb defusals in the most intense book i have ever read. I recommend this book to anyone who has played any of the Tom Clancy Video games or is interested into Government special operations or anything along those lines. This book had me jumping out of my seat after very descriptive content of the aftermath of an operation. I found out about this book through my father who has read almost all of the Tom Clancy Books. Can John Clark and his team beat eliminate the terrorist group? Find out by reading R6.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Another great story featuring John Clark and Domingo Chavez.

  24. 5 out of 5

    L.M. Mountford

    This the last Tom Clancy book I will ever try and read. I'm afriad that as of today i have Black Balled the author and will be removing all his books from my collection.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Solid, and researched. Not quite the finesse of Brent Weeks or Patrick Rothfuss, but these authors would not publish their masterpieces until 10-15 years after Rainbow Six was written. For me, the sometimes clunky and testosterone laden writing style was trumped by the scope of the plot-which I certainly found mind-expanding, and no doubt skull crushing for its day-and the pace and rising intensity leading up to the climax. There were a few inside military references I did not understand but mayb Solid, and researched. Not quite the finesse of Brent Weeks or Patrick Rothfuss, but these authors would not publish their masterpieces until 10-15 years after Rainbow Six was written. For me, the sometimes clunky and testosterone laden writing style was trumped by the scope of the plot-which I certainly found mind-expanding, and no doubt skull crushing for its day-and the pace and rising intensity leading up to the climax. There were a few inside military references I did not understand but maybe I just have not read enough books. I remember the NU64 adaptation of Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six as intense and enjoyable 2-player action with my best friend at the time (with GnR Live also playing on his dad's boombox in the basement as background music). I remember one level or map that seemed to reflect an event in the book, but that would have been 15 years before I would read what would later turn out to be the inspiration for the game. Going even further back, and for the record, I called this way back during sophomore year of high school. Everybody thought I was crazy, but the major part of the plot, I said would happen. Although I said it would happen in China, not where it did in the book. I think there was potential for the author, god rest his soul, to have explored the actual shape of a double rainbow in the book with the plot, metaphorically speaking of course, or even in the form of writing style. Create an event, or have a character appear in the very beginning, or write at a certain angle or flare, then leave a huge space,and refrain from using it, and then tie it back in the end, like the ends of a double rainbow road. Neat! Maybe even figure out how to write sentences in the shape of a double rainbow. The dog ran home. Noun, verb, noun. I don't know, just an idea, but a potential cherry on top with a beginning/end rainbow. Anyways, speaking of shapes, like Stephen King's Doctor Sleep, I was struck by the geometric shape of an "A" in summation of the contents of this novel. Both groups were headed in a similar direction of what they believed was for the greater good. Anyone else similarly perceive this shape? On a personal level, I think its high time the rainbow was liberated from the symbol of the LGTB community. I recognize their intent to represent their...lets say LGTB ways, or rather, different colors of lifestyle, orientation, or biology, but the backlash has been a stigmatization of the rainbow by those of conventional or straight orientation. I bought a winter hat one time that was rainbow colored, and sure, it was bright, but I liked the style, especially because it fit my big head, which can be rare. Well, it only got worn a handful of times because like a lighthouse, it was a beacon, attracting attention from the wrong team. Look, we're all a team okay, so lets legalize the cannabis, connect major cites with bike paths, start using renewable energy sources more, and stop hassling the LGTB community so we can all enjoy the rainbow no matter what our orientation. I offer the idea of using all possible variations of 2 male and 2 female symbols, and 2 "other" symbols as the LGTB flag in return. You're homosexuals, you can have ONE color. 1. I mean, c'mon, lets get real here for a second. What does a rainbow mean? It literally means, "the reflection, refraction and dispersion of light in water droplets." (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rainbow) That's literally what the rainbow means in terms of science.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jerome

    What can I say? Wow! Right from the start, that most excellent of storytellers, Tom Clancy, throws us into action with a detailed yet gripping account of a hijacking. In some of his previous books (most notably Patriot Games, Executive Orders and The Sum of All Fears) the story dies for a hundred pages or more as Clancy explains the story (and regrettably, this has resulted in many readers stopping reading mid-way through a book... But no more. Rainbow Six keeps up the heart pumping action right What can I say? Wow! Right from the start, that most excellent of storytellers, Tom Clancy, throws us into action with a detailed yet gripping account of a hijacking. In some of his previous books (most notably Patriot Games, Executive Orders and The Sum of All Fears) the story dies for a hundred pages or more as Clancy explains the story (and regrettably, this has resulted in many readers stopping reading mid-way through a book... But no more. Rainbow Six keeps up the heart pumping action right the way through as though there is no tomorrow - and there may well not be! Long as it is, Clancy has once again kept my full attention resulting in late nights, staying up far too late turning page by page to find out WHAT HAPPENS! I was worried that Clancy was beginning to dull in his stories, having read Executive Orders which was explosively exciting in the last pages but, I felt, took too long to get there. And having read the co-authored Op-Centers, I was very worried as they all lacked the quick pace and exciting realism common to many Clancy books. However, I felt that singling out environmentalists as the bad guys was not a good marketing move (if not resulting in an excellent book!) and that their methods and ideals were not credible enough to bring a true sense of realism. I did enjoy the fantastic end to the story and hope that, true to Clancy style, Dmitry Popov will appear in another book in the near furture! And for the second time, Clancy has focused the book on John Kelly (otherwise known as Clark). Clark has definitely changed since the torture days portrayed in Without Remorse, become more mature, even mellowed in age. I missed good old Jack Ryan however although Clancy referred to Clark's good relationship with "The President". I felt that Jack deserved more place although, I think Clancy may have brought an end to Jack Ryan as a major role in Executive Orders. Keen followers of Clancy will note how Jack gradually rose through the ranks - ordinary history teacher and a lucky stock investor, then working at CIA, eventually becoming, DDO, DDI and eventually head of the CIA (which I believe is DCI, right?). Then going on to National Security Advisor, Vice-President (albeit for a short time) and finally President. I can think of no higher occupation for Ryan and this leads me to believe Clancy has decided to leave him out of future novels. I hope I am wrong... Is Clancy, in his usual portrayal of realistic events (as opposed to fantasy ones) going to let John Clark and Jack Ryan simply die of old age? Whilst this would be true to form, they would be sorely missed, and only Ding seems to be able to replace either of them. Are future books to hold only Domingo Chavez and not the beloved Clark-Chavez team? Will Jack retire? We can't tell. Clancy has shrouded us in a black cloak of curiosity until he chooses to reveal antoher piece of the unending story he weaves. And even then, we surely will not get the last piece of the puzzle. We will be left again to wait until it is time...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hw Gray

    This is my first Tom Clancy's book. I enjoy espionage and military story, hence his plot really suit me. At first, i am still worried about his word glutton and draggy (repeating of events) style of writting, that might lead me to boredom or difficulty to understand, but it seems fine to me after a while. In fact, i am amazed by so much details about military weapon and machine that the author put in his book. Information of the counterterrorism operations, mainly from intelligence and special u This is my first Tom Clancy's book. I enjoy espionage and military story, hence his plot really suit me. At first, i am still worried about his word glutton and draggy (repeating of events) style of writting, that might lead me to boredom or difficulty to understand, but it seems fine to me after a while. In fact, i am amazed by so much details about military weapon and machine that the author put in his book. Information of the counterterrorism operations, mainly from intelligence and special unit, is thoroughly told which drew me even deeper. The plot is very organised and new elements are added at stages. It started off by forming counterterrorism unit called Rainbow Six which comprised of two elite teams and lead by former CIA commander, John Clark. These are just bare minimum teams which consists of team leader, snipers, negotiator, technical expert and assault troopers. Every detail in missions and even After-Action-Reviews (AAR), which most authors will skip, are emphaised. In the AAR, complete discussion and short-coming are brought up and unit commander will address the issues. First improvement is the introduction of a new element, a utility helicopter MH60K night hawk, into the operation. The helicopter increases the unit's capability by its ability to transport troop to short distance, inaccessible area, troop roping which allows roof assault and sometimes it can even distract enemies. Subsequently, more state-of-the-art jammed equipment, which disrupted cell phones and disabled terrorist's communication, and tracking system, which able to know the terrorist's exact position, are used in their mission. One last point which worth mentioning is the author's perception towards the terrorists mind. His prediction is quite close to real thing. Overall, i feel that it is a great accomplishment to complete such a thick book - almost 900 pages. I will recommend readers, who enjoy espionage and military stories, to pick up this book as well.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael Stocksdale

    The title Rainbow Six is actually the code name for ex CIA agent John Clark, director of a newly formed counter-terrorism unit, Rainbow. This tight knit group of former special forces and counter-terrorist units from around the world have one primary objective, stop the bad guys at any cost. John Brittling is that bad guy. He and his organization, the Horizon Corporation, have developed an Ebola like virus code-named Shiva virus with one purpose, the complete annihilation of the human race in or The title Rainbow Six is actually the code name for ex CIA agent John Clark, director of a newly formed counter-terrorism unit, Rainbow. This tight knit group of former special forces and counter-terrorist units from around the world have one primary objective, stop the bad guys at any cost. John Brittling is that bad guy. He and his organization, the Horizon Corporation, have developed an Ebola like virus code-named Shiva virus with one purpose, the complete annihilation of the human race in order to restore the world to its former state and bring it back under the influence of nature and animals. Rainbow will have to connect the dots in order to save the human species before the clock runs out. Considering the fact that the Shiva virus is so like the Ebola virus that has recently plagued our society I felt like I was reading a horror story instead of an action novel. Despite never actually serving in the military, Tom Clancy brings to life the realness of combat and reading scenes where Rainbow is performing in action were heart-pounding moments. Being interested in any subject concerning the armed forces, this book was especially well received on my part. I feel that because the book is quite long (over 700 pages) I wouldn't recommend it to someone who is not as intrigued by this subject as I am.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

    Espionage is always a favorite of mine, more particularly in films than in books as it seems better a visual than what words can offer. Nonetheless I read this a few years ago because I loved the title. I think I may have played the video game, too, but not so much that I remember enjoying. It was just after the film 'The Sum of All Fears' came out and Liev Schreiber played John Clark (a mere supporting role there, whereas here the main player), and quite well. I imagined him older here, as he i Espionage is always a favorite of mine, more particularly in films than in books as it seems better a visual than what words can offer. Nonetheless I read this a few years ago because I loved the title. I think I may have played the video game, too, but not so much that I remember enjoying. It was just after the film 'The Sum of All Fears' came out and Liev Schreiber played John Clark (a mere supporting role there, whereas here the main player), and quite well. I imagined him older here, as he is supposed to be near retirement, but that made the reading easier. If you have never read a Clancy book, start here because I think it's the only book I could get through without going into a coma after each chapter. Granted, he has his moments of ranting, mostly about technical jargon only a military colonel would understand, not to mention his need to explain every detail in every character's (major or minute) life. Anyhow, the story is enough to keep you going, and don't worry it does end in a way you won't expect. I may never read it again for fear that I will be eighty or so by the time I finish, but it's still worth the read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christian

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Tom Clancy has written another big hit that has readers all over the world on the edge of their seat. When terrorists in Europe are aroused there is only one team that can stop them quickly, and efficiently. Rainbow 6. They are a team comprised of the best soldiers that every country has to offer. They got the most and best high tech equipment in the world. They have a great commander, John Clark. They have everything you can imagine. When some extremist tree huggers come to kill all the people w Tom Clancy has written another big hit that has readers all over the world on the edge of their seat. When terrorists in Europe are aroused there is only one team that can stop them quickly, and efficiently. Rainbow 6. They are a team comprised of the best soldiers that every country has to offer. They got the most and best high tech equipment in the world. They have a great commander, John Clark. They have everything you can imagine. When some extremist tree huggers come to kill all the people who threaten Mother Nature, Somebody has to stop them. They rile up the terrorists in Europe to act as a distraction for their diabolical plan to destroy the human race. Rainbow 6 defeats the terrorists every time without a loss of a man. The race is on to find out who is trying to kill the whole world. There is lots of figurative language in this book. There is also a lot of foreshadowing that gives the book a sense of suspense. The book is really nicely written and there is lots of simile’s and metaphors. Clancy has great finesse when he writes this book. It is a great book that I hope you will love.

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